Modern Energy Management

Exploring the Hidden Costs of Manual Data Processes with Tim Porter of Urjanet

October 31, 2019 Season 1 Episode 8
Modern Energy Management
Exploring the Hidden Costs of Manual Data Processes with Tim Porter of Urjanet
Chapters
Modern Energy Management
Exploring the Hidden Costs of Manual Data Processes with Tim Porter of Urjanet
Oct 31, 2019 Season 1 Episode 8
Nate Nilles , Amber Artrip, Tim Porter
Tune in as we chat with Tim Porter, the Director of Partner Sales at Urjanet, and we explore how much processing utility bill data manually is actually costing organizations.
Show Notes Transcript

Tune in as we chat with Tim Porter, the Director of Partner Sales at Urjanet, and we explore how much processing utility bill data manually is actually costing organizations. In this episode, we discuss the results of a recent Smart Energy Decisions survey to over 200 energy and sustainability professionals. We review:

  • Why 55% of respondents are still processing utility bills manually
  • The hidden costs and unknown negative impacts of manual processes
  • The technology behind automated bill data collection
  • Stories from organizations who made the switch from manual to automated bill processing


Speaker 1:
0:01
Hello everyone and welcome to the modern energy management podcast. This is a podcast for energy sustainability and facilities innovators to share their stories of modern energy management at their organizations. My name is Amber, our trip, and I'm your producer and host of the show and I'm happy to be joined here by my co host, Nate Nylas. Thanks Amber. Ready to rock. And today we have a really special episode we've brought on one of our partners from Urgenet and with us today we have Tim Porter who is the director of partner sales at Urgenet. Welcome to the show, Tim.
Speaker 2:
0:37
Thanks Amber. Really excited about being here today.
Speaker 3:
0:40
So Tim, I was looking forward to this one. I know we've had an opportunity to work together for the last almost six years now and various, uh, you know, partner capacities, but also through different events, uh, that we have, uh, supported both organizations, which is fantastic for the people that don't know Urgenet as well by name. I love for you to take a moment just to tell us a little bit more about the organization, kind of your role or the team's mission and driving energy and sustainability and how you got here.
Speaker 2:
1:17
Nate, happy to be here. Thanks for that quick intro. I'd be happy to give a quick overview of uh, of our business and as you said, we may not be that well known because often we are just a plumbing and side of a lot of the tools that get used by energy professionals to make the good decisions that they make every day. And so we're in a nutshell, I guess the way, best way to describe us as plumbers of utility data, we have a platform that we built that automates gathering data from over 6,000 utilities today in an automated way that allows you to not have to worry about the messy, dirty work of collecting the data that you need as an energy professional to make the decisions that you need to make and do the planning and reporting that you're being asked to do. My specific role here is I've been here about six years, a little over six years, and I help integrate our solution with partners that are the ones really helping companies make those good decisions and drive their energy initiatives, uh, as, as lucid does. So, uh, really happy to be here and talk about what we're seeing in the world of modern technology and in the energy world.
Speaker 3:
2:27
That's awesome. And I don't really want to trivialize how much lift that is. Right? Uh, you probably have an army of folks I know that are working, you know, with that data. We have so many customers that are living in the world of manual data entry spreadsheets, you know, data quality, uh, et cetera. And so maybe tell us a little bit, it's a big lift, right, for you guys to have an engine that can support folks to make it easier to drive data to platforms like ours. Give us a look. [inaudible] behind the curtain.
Speaker 2:
2:59
Yeah. So it is, uh, a fairly large sized task to take on the role that we've, that we've taken on. We've got about somewhere North of 400 people in our business today. We've been doing it for 10 plus years and that's all to get to the point that we are in now and we realized pretty quickly after starting that there are just so many data sources in the utility world, especially as you start to do this globally that your job kind of will never stop and you'll always find a new place to go and build a bot or write some software. They can grab data and that's why our job has, has required that we continue to grow at the rate that we have. We've got, as I said, connections I think today is just North of 6,500 utilities and we've grown that internationally quite a bit in the last couple of years to about 47 different countries I believe as well and all different dialects and languages.
Speaker 2:
3:54
So it's a, it's a job that never finishes because once we think we've gotten most of the integrations completed, somebody comes up with a new one that they would like and then there's the ongoing upkeep of the keeping those connections live. And active because they're always changing. They're always changing. We have to have people, programmers that are always looking for what needs to be tweaked next to keep the data flowing. So yeah, it's a, it's a fairly large endeavor that we've, that we've decided to focus our, our lives on, but we do feel like it helps reduce a bunch of the, the dirty work that otherwise people would have to figure out on their own and detract from all the things that could be done if you had those smart energy folks doing things that really helped impact or their properties and impact their business as opposed to just gathering spreadsheets full of data.
Speaker 3:
4:42
Well, we certainly appreciate it. You know, it's like the job of the guy painting the, the golden state bridge, right? Never ending. But, uh, you know, I think, I think the myth in the industry is that utility data is clean and it should be easy to implement into an energy and sustainability platform. But there is a ton, as you know, sausage making going on behind the scenes between our two organizations to really deliver that, that end use product. So we appreciate it.
Speaker 1:
5:09
Yeah. And it's, it's interesting and really timely that uh, because we just launched a survey together, um, Urgenet and building O S to the smart energy decisions audience, all about how many energy managers are still out there using these manual processes to collect building data. So Tim, do you want to speak to, um, a little tease of what we've learned from the survey?
Speaker 2:
5:35
Okay, yeah, sure. Happy to share some of the data that we've gathered in advance. You know, we weren't entirely sure we had a guess at what we thought the responses might indicate. But, uh, we have seen specifically in this most recent survey that somewhere near 55% of energy managers are still using manual data collection for at least of their utility bills. So that's over half the majority of energy managers still relying on some kind of manual process to do this. And if you get to the point of looking at interval data or meter readings from, from smart meters that really have a, a great deal to do with the impact that your energy programs can have. 32% of those are manually recording meter readings from smart meters into their systems. And I would venture to guess that the remaining 68% that aren't doing it manually are probably in the category of just not doing it at all because meter data is data that comes typically, you know, for electric meters at 15 minute intervals and is available often if not in real time.
Speaker 2:
6:44
Certainly every day. And I don't think there's many folks downloading meter data every day to manually enter it. They're probably doing it every week or every month. So, uh, yeah, those are some of the, some was it results that we saw from the survey. And we also saw that on the flip side, 67% or two thirds said that getting data streams automated and organized and brought into some kind of accessible location or database or system is really important to the success of their energy management program. They feel like that's a really key component of success for them. So a lot of we're doing it manually, still, majority of them and an even higher majority say that automating and getting these or these data streams organized as a key success criteria. So there's certainly a good gap there that, that, uh, that can be, that people could be helped with.
Speaker 1:
7:35
Yeah, it was really fascinating to see those results because you're right, we always kind of had an idea. We know that people are still using a lot of manual processes, but to see that 55% are still in some way or another manually processing billing data, just really telling. Um, so I know that you guys have done some research at Urgenet around the hidden impacts and costs of manually processing utility bill data. I'd love to hear your perspective on that.
Speaker 2:
8:05
Sure. There's, there's a handful of ways I'll describe four specific reasons or impacts that we have seen, maybe not necessarily in any particular order, but the first one that people typically think of is cost, cost of labor, and with the complexity of all the different formats that you're going to see from utility invoices, just as an example, we've seen that it can cost up to $5 to process a single bill manually. Um, and there's also a human costs to that, that outside of just what you might be paying someone to do that work, these are not going to be super enthusiastic and, and, uh, stable people in your organization if that's all that they're doing every day. So we've seen a really high burnout rate from manual data entry teams. And so there's this retention problem. As everyone knows, the more you have to hire people in to take over someone who's left, there's a an in built expense of trying to get somebody ramped up.
Speaker 2:
9:00
And so that retention problem is particularly challenging when you're asking someone to sit behind a desk and type dating and all day. So automating that helps make the most of their time and uh, only really ideally dedicated to people that you're paying salaries to, to things that are more impactful for the organization. So cost is kind of the first impact. It's probably not so hidden cause that seems to be one of the big drivers often. The second is data quality and manual data entry is pretty famously error prone. We've seen that probably conservatively speaking, even folks that are really good at it with have that have tools to do it, we'll make an error every, at least one every 100 data elements that they're entering. So depending on how many data elements you're actually collecting off of an invoice, um, you might be making a mistake on every two or three bills, every three or four bills that you are entering data for.
Speaker 2:
9:58
And that's maybe fine if you maybe mistyped type the name of a tariff, for instance. But if you fat finger a usage or a peak demand or a peak demand charge and you misplace a decimal, that can make some pretty big impact on what you're reporting against. And certainly decisions that you're making. So quality is always uh, also a, a factor that matters quite a bit and people, I'm finding problems with the manual data process. A couple of other ones I would say that maybe are quite so obvious but they are in particular use cases. One is processing speed. So people that are relying on getting the bill to make more timely decisions. Maybe this is just your AP department, maybe it's just your folks that are making sure that the bill is paid on time, how quickly you get those invoices in. The data from them really, really matters to them because the bill is kind of in between the company and I'm in a late fee or God forbid a shutoff notice.
Speaker 2:
10:56
So speed actually can be impacted through automation quite a bit as well. There's really two people that you can try to remove from this process. The one we talked about, um, or optimizing this process. One is the data entry person themselves, but the other ones, the mailman, and one of the biggest sources of delay in getting the data that you want is just having to go through the mail and waiting for the post office to deliver the invoice that has all this data on it that you want to get. And so if you can simply remove the mail man from this equation, then I then you can really speed up the timing of when this data is going to be made available to people. So speed is really an important thing. Um, and then the last one I'll just mention because I just had a really interesting conversation with a customer a couple of months ago, and I guess you might call this business continuity, but people that are really relying on utility invoices coming in everyday, maybe multifamily properties that need this information to create the rent bills that they're sending out to their tenants.
Speaker 2:
11:56
For instance. For example, if there's anything that disrupts the flow of that data and if the data flow is driving around on four wheels in a, in a truck, a mail truck, and it's got hands all over it with people processing invoices, then that can really cause problems. And this one customer of ours told us that there was a, a chemical spill, I think it was, believe it or not, at a mail processing facility. So somebody had shifted a package with some liquid that broke open and spilled all over the floor and they literally shut the post office processing center down for about eight days and all that, while every bit of data out of mail that came into that facility was on hold. And so they went weeks without getting invoices that they were responsible for paying and that caused real, real problems. So removing all the physical aspects of retrieving this information really does help kind of avoid problems that you might never have thought about. I wouldn't have expected a chemical spill in a post office processing facility to ever be a problem for energy management people to worry about. But that ended up, that ended up being a real problem. So those are just some of the impacts or kind of maybe not so obvious reasons that mangled data collection can, can cause problems.
Speaker 3:
13:16
Yeah, it's pretty amazing that with all the technology going on around us and the things happening in buildings, how much we're, we still rely on manual, uh, delivery, right. Of something is, eh, that's been around for so long as like do utility bill. It's, it's kinda mind blowing.
Speaker 2:
13:34
It is. It is. But it also speaks to the nature of the industry as well. If you were talking about computers or if you were talking about napkins or any other commodity or, or, uh, important resource that a company buys and consumes, you might not worry so much about how many vendors you're getting it from and how they represent what it is you're buying from them. But in the utility space, you often don't have a choice, right? And regulator in regulated markets and deregulated markets, you do, but they're, they're more interested in providing you with the, the power that you're buying, the water that you're buying the gas turbine. And they don't really care quite as much how the data is presented to you, right? They're just, they're just trying to make sure that they get paid for what they're providing you. And so there's not a lot of incentive for the, for instance, 3000 electricity providers in the country to come up with any standard way to show you what you've used from them or tell you how it is that you're paying them.
Speaker 2:
14:32
And that's different when you're able to consolidate as a, as a company a commodity that, that you might only source from two or three different vendors, um, in your organization. And when this ends up potentially representing, you know, five to 10% of the, of the corporate spend in America, that's a pretty big piece of what people, companies are spending their money on. That is coming from a set of vendors that are, you know, widely varied. And I'm not sure there's any industry that you'd be buying stuff from. Certainly at that level that's more this more fragmented and has more providers that you're actually kind of forced to deal with. So I think it does speak to the fact that this is one of the reasons utility invoicing and span and data is one of the lead, last sort of bastions of, of enterprise data to be automated in any form or fashion.
Speaker 3:
15:26
I think that's an interesting point and most of it, Tim, and you'll have to tell me, has been a push from regulatory, um, reasons for the utilities to actually do what they've done to open up the flow or access to that data. Is that a correct?
Speaker 2:
15:42
That is true. That is true. You can get there. There are, there's enough movement of foot now to help people become more efficient in their consumption and to help people be more green in their thinking and more sustainable in their actions. And that does start with having information to allow them to do that. And so the utility companies can help there because they are the sources of the, of the data that, you know, they're the ones reading the meters. They're the ones that are showing what your peak demand is and at what time of day. All that information is coming from the utility companies. Um, so they, they understand that they need to make it available. Uh, but that's a pretty big lift on their part to even make it available. Asking them to also do that in a way that standardized or easy to consume machine readable, all that stuff is not something that utility companies a are really probably interested in or be really equipped to do. They're not, they're not data people. So, um, but yeah, for sure we're getting cooperation from them and they're all happy for us to help them get the data that their customers need, uh, in a way that they can use it more easily. Uh, but that they, they're almost more excited about it because that means they don't have to try and do it and they can let someone like us do
Speaker 3:
17:00
even a better reason for us to, uh, choose this partnership. Um, you mentioned something in the top four. I thought those were super interesting and maybe as it relates to what we see in modern energy manager too, you talked about the cost of labor. Your first point there, and specifically you talked about data entry teams. You know what we find a lot of times is that they don't have a data entry team. So the burnout is really high level employees, right? They have individuals whose value added activities should be focused in spent elsewhere, but they're doing the data entry. So I think the risk becomes even higher to those core groups, core teams or personnel that has it just as a a job they have to facilitate to deliver a report, whether it's internally, externally, et cetera. So the risk is quite a bit higher on the point number one.
Speaker 2:
17:53
Yeah, no question. No question. I mean the, the real end users of all this information, the real kind of audience in this Newton and on modern version of energy management and sustainability management is at the end users K in the actual, you were talking about a company specifically who is the one that has to make decisions and be smart about what they're doing. And the people that they hire are typically not data entry clerks. They're not looking to do that. That's not a headcount that they typically have many, uh, that they can pull from or hire for. And so they have people doing it that are, like you said, they're, they're trained to enter energy professionals. These are sustainability reporting, uh, degreed people coming out of college that want to help the company be more sustainable in their efforts. And when they're told, this is great, I'm going to let you look at all this data to figure out what we ought to be doing next.
Speaker 2:
18:48
But Hey, by the way, you need to spend half your week getting the data available to do that. They're like, wait a minute. I didn't want to sign up to be a, a spreadsheet jockey or a guy go on to websites to download invoices and look at it and type it in. So, um, it's really a matter of trying to get your, your really talented professionals that people are being given resources to hire and allow them to do what it is that they've been trained to do and that they're good at and not forced them to do some of this grunt work that makes their job no fun. Um, for sure. So yeah, you're, you're exactly right. A turnover for a person that is being forced to do dat data entry when they would much rather be right. Sustainability reports are looking for locations that have terrible peak demand that they could try to focus on some projects with. Is a, is a big loss when that does happen.
Speaker 3:
19:39
Absolutely. Tim, I, I'd love to know, you know, Urgenet has been growing rapidly, so congratulations and hats off to the team, but I think a lot of the growth has been driven by energy and sustainability being, you know, up front and, uh, of interest to more and more companies as we see, you know, the environmental changes, regulatory changes, just overall economic growth. Do you see it's there or are there other problems that you guys are focused on solving that is really expanding the business?
Speaker 2:
20:12
No, our growth really in the last in particular couple of years has been for a couple of reasons. Primarily just I think this is my guest and if I had a crystal ball, then my CEO would, would pay me to rub it in and find out what the next thing is. But it's really been, I think an overall lift that's this occurred in the space in the energy management sustainability industry. And it goes everywhere from people taking that as a degree in there. And, you know, college experience I think, which is a great indicator. I do a lot with boy Scouts. There's actually a sustainability edge now, believe it or not. Um, so, you know, it's, it's become a whole lot more of a, of a water cooler topic, I believe in something that's hitting people's, uh, corporate focus and corporate agendas. And I also think that because of the reporting that's being done more frequently now and the ability that people have, companies have to compare themselves to peers.
Speaker 2:
21:11
Not only their own investors and constituents, or are they asking for, you know, well, how do you stack it up against the votes that I'm not invested in, in this industry? Um, but they're also seeing real meaningful change that companies in their industries have been able to make, not just from a sustainability and green perspective, which matters for sure. And that does have a lot to do with how your company is perceived, but also from the bottom line perspective. So, you know, we've got some really good examples that we've seen of companies that have made, you know, significantly material cost savings, uh, that they've been able to, to, to find through investing in energy management initiative and hiring people that are specialists in just that space. And I think seeing people not only reap the benefits of, of what the, the market says about their business, but also really re the financial benefits of focusing and investing on where to save dollars. Um, it's, it's sort of a double, a double whammy bonus. And, uh, and people are seeing that that's, uh, a real, a real achievable goal that, uh, by looking at their peers. And so I think in general, the industry itself has just gotten a lift in the last couple of years because there's been a lot of success. It's been reported and that people can see,
Speaker 3:
22:32
I think you nailed it on that, right? We see a big shift in just some of the personnel in energy and sustainability that is obviously very, very mission driven, but you nailed it on the comparison to your peers, right? I think this lift of corporate sustainability or corporate responsibility, uh, and not only how you attract talent, but uh, how they are driving and utilizing those savings for just the overall perception of the organization's been a huge, huge driver. And that may be a good segue into a question of maybe specifically for Urgenet. How have you seen customers implement modern energy management? Do you have an example you'd love to share?
Speaker 2:
23:15
Actually, yeah, there is one that comes to mind is for a health care organization. And it was interesting to track their progress and their planning efforts. They initially started with some direction from their executive team with a pretty ambitious goal, but effectively just to say, Hey, I need you to try to shave 20% of our energy spend across the board. And they didn't know exactly what that would mean cost wise. They assumed that it would for sure have to represent some material savings, but that was really the goal that they were. And so they started to do some planning and they, they did actually a very good job of planning some of this in a war room before they went out and just started to jump in the water with with projects. But they realized right away that to get what they needed, they needed to focus on the data and they needed to focus on where it was coming from and what information they needed and they, they recognized for them for it.
Speaker 2:
24:10
So they recognize that the data sources that they have, they have about a hundred facilities all over the country that they didn't have anybody who was a data specialist. It was looking to manually enter data or, or even go out and hunt and find this information. So they, they decided to choose, um, to go the automation route and try to get as much of it electronically as they, as they possibly could. And they started the way that a lot the people start where they said they wanted to get all the data that they could into energy star portfolio manager to compare themselves with their peers but also to compare themselves to themselves. And uh, they did that. They got data from utility invoices to begin that. And I would call that a fairly traditional or straight forward, uh, energy management project, right? That, uh, that they saw some benefit from, but they realized something really interesting quickly in a lot of their organization.
Speaker 2:
25:07
And other facilities are actually hospitals, right? So they're a pretty significant energy requirements there that are different from a corporation. You're not shutting the lights off necessarily in hospital at six 30 in the evening and you can't turn the air conditioning down like you might in a corporate facility. So they had different unique requirements and it was only after they started to look at the information that they realized that a lot of the information that they needed was going to be way too light to be effective if they had to wait for monthly provided information. So if they were only looking at a data that came on invoices and that was it, then they were going to be stuck. They needed to have data in a much more rapid way available in a much more rapid way. And so they um, they realized that there were daily decisions that needed to be made on adjusting settings, on changing things based on occupancy and that sort of thing.
Speaker 2:
26:06
That somebody who was able to calculate for them that there was over $4,000 a day in savings that they could either realize or not if they were able to make decisions on a daily basis. And what that said, if you waited for let's say 45 days for a new invoice to come out, for you to get the data from that invoice and plug it into some system that helps you dashboard and decide what kind of changes you need to make, then you're missing 45 days worth of $4,000 a day in savings opportunity, which that math I can do. And that's like over $180,000 and potential savings just because they couldn't make adjustments on a daily basis. And so they realized very, very quickly that the way they needed to do their energy management projects was really centralized around interval data and they needed to get data every day that showed them what happened that day based on the most recent winter storm or the most recent occupancy numbers and what type of patients they had on what floors.
Speaker 2:
27:10
And so by doing that, they were able to realize a very high percentage that $180,000 worth of potential missed savings, uh, that really, really made a pretty meaningful impact. So they, they ended up having a very, very successful project. They, uh, over a five year period, they were able to achieve that 20% reduction in energy use. So what it was, they were tasked with a accomplished, but they could also report, um, obviously very happily [inaudible] whoever was it was in charge of this, of this energy initiative that ended up saving. And this is Justin. In one year, I think this was 2018, they saved through those reduction efforts, four and a half million dollars in energy costs. That was just just in one year. And that's a, that's a pretty good chunk that one of them, um, said they thought that that was the equivalent of powering five hospitals for free for a year.
Speaker 2:
28:07
And so that's a pretty easy return on investment to, to have your executive team say, yeah, job well done. So you know, from a, from a modern energy management standpoint, I think the thing that impressed me with their project was how it was that they went about determining what they needed to have in their infrastructure and realized quickly by doing it in a kind of a logical step wise fashion that the most important information for them was this daily refresh of information that could allow them to make daily decisions. And so, you know, they got the table stakes in place with invoice data and energy star portfolio manager and then they went from there into a, you know, a much more sophisticated daily updated 15 minute consumption information type of process that they were able to automate and have as a part of a full system. So that, I thought that was a really interesting and certainly a very successful project from one of the customers we've spoken with.
Speaker 3:
29:04
Well Tim, you're, you're hired bud. I don't know how I'm going to come up with a better plug for savings for real time.
Speaker 2:
29:13
Yeah, it's, you know, they're the things that you can see everyone that we've talked to when they can go and look backwards and see what a performance graph looks like for their facilities, almost everybody's surprised with something either, you know, how things don't shut off like they expected or when they expect they should or spike showing up that they can, you know, they really have no explanation for, um, so yes, that, that level of information really, really valuable. A few you got.
Speaker 3:
29:43
Yeah, I think it's a great point and I think the interesting thing is too, and you, and you really nailed it, is that when we talk about modern energy management or even just the applicable use cases for where our customers are on their journey is it doesn't have to be a massive lift, right? If you think about it in terms of just figuring out the right infrastructure, figuring out the right data needed for the use cases, there's an incredible amount of savings to be had. And it doesn't mean that, you know, this decision of modern energy management has to be paralyzing. It can, it can really be a basic first step.
Speaker 2:
30:20
Yeah, for sure. In fact, I would say that probably most of the successful projects that we've heard about and talked with didn't start with a big bang that they did off a piece of the Apple that they could chew very comfortably. And, and it's also because of the, the way the energy team is getting itself sort of elevated within an organization. It's really important for those teams in particular for companies just starting out with sustainability and energy efforts to have some early wins and to have some things that they can point back to, to say, you know, this is what I've done. This is the investment that you've given me. Here's the return that we've seen and did, you know, and then fill in the blank. Right. And, and those sorts of, um, early wins and things that they can go back to their constituents and say, this is worth it. I can show you why, um, quickly is really important for them to get that next round of funding and help them take the next step as opposed to, you know, arguing for $50 million to invest right on day one and hope that it works out.
Speaker 3:
31:24
No doubt. We see that a lot too. So it's pretty exciting too when you can help people with a phase one that you'd know is going to be highly successful. Yeah. So Tim, do you have anything coming up on the urgent ed side that you'd like to share with the audience or promote? I know you guys are probably active in a lot of different initiatives and conferences, et cetera.
Speaker 2:
31:44
Yeah, I'm really, I'm really excited about this joint ebook that we're coming out with, with building OSTP next month. I think I'm really interested to see the feedback that we, that we get from the smart people that know what they're looking at when they read that type of information. But we also have something we're putting together that's a cost savings calculator that we're really excited about too. And it's intended to help people really quickly. And at a glance show you based on your current processes, how much you might save by automating the data collection process within your organization. And if we've accurately identified that 55% of the world is still doing it that way, then hopefully those 55% majority are going to find this calculator interesting as well. So that's something you can look out for from Urgenet here in the, in the next several weeks.
Speaker 3:
32:34
Amber, I feel like you've already got the wheels in motion on something good to do with that data for, for our customers.
Speaker 1:
32:39
Yeah, that's going to be a great resource for our customers. So really looking forward to that one. And like you mentioned and looking forward to our joint state of energy management's ebook that's coming out with smart energy decisions.com and we're also going to be, um, promoting that on a webinar. So we'll probably bring Tim back and we'll talk about the results from the surveys. So really looking forward to that.
Speaker 3:
33:05
So Tim, one of the things that we love to ask everyone towards the tail end of these podcasts is, you know, for the listeners out there, most are energy and sustainability professionals, but any words of wisdom that you want to throw their direction as they continue on their journey and trying to optimize their systems or processes for the companies that they work for?
Speaker 2:
33:28
Yeah, I would say maybe three things to try to keep it simple. One, look at interval data, if you have it, to see what that, what insight that might provide your organization. Certainly leverage automation where you can because there is so much fruit that can be born from doing that. And there's so much more that you can do. If you can automate the collection sources of this data and finally create a plan to start with. And I would suggest as you brought up Nate earlier start slow so that you can go fast, bite off a piece that you can chew and get some early wins and have that grow into the really, you know, meaningful, big magnitude savings that, uh, that I think are out there for. So, so many people that just haven't looked yet.
Speaker 1:
34:11
Awesome. Move slow so you can move fast. I love that. Thank you Tim for joining us on the show. I think this was a really great episode and I think our listeners will walk away with a lot of insight after this. The thanks again for joining us.
Speaker 2:
34:26
Thank you guys. Really appreciate it.
Speaker 1:
34:28
And for all the listeners out there, everything that you heard about, um, on this podcast episode will be available to you on modern energy management.co and this is a website where will he will be posting our podcast, but we'll also be posting the ebook, uh, for the state of modern energy management and we'll even add a link to Urgenet cost-savings quiz. So, um, be sure to subscribe to our podcast, which is available on all podcasting platforms. And if you like what you hear, please give us a rating on Apple podcasts and uh, send us a review and let us know how we're doing. [inaudible] and we will be back next week with more great modern energy management stories for you.
Speaker 3:
35:12
Thanks for tuning in. Thanks Amber. Thanks everybody.
Speaker 2:
35:16
Yeah, so yep.
Speaker 1:
38:29
And, uh, send us a review and let us know how we're doing and we will be back next week with more great modern energy management stories for you. Thanks for tuning in. Thanks, Amber. Thanks everybody. Yeah, awesome. That was really great. You guys.
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